Author Archives: Jeffrey

Susie and the Fairy Carrot – Story XXXI

Susie and the Fairy Carrot

Susie and the Fairy Carrot - Story XXXI

Continuing our exploration of the word Skilligimink, we check in on Howard R. Garis, the author of several books covering the adventures of Uncle Wiggily and his forest friends.

Here is a short chapter from his book “Uncle Wiggily and the Littletails” that shows a usage of the term. Click on to read the chapter, Susie and the Fairy Carrot (pdf).

Hiding the Easter Eggs – Story XXIV

Hiding the Easter Eggs

Hiding the Easter Eggs, Story XXIV

Continuing our exploration of the word Skilligimink, we check in on Howard R. Garis, the author of several books covering the adventures of Uncle Wiggily and his forest friends.

Here is a short chapter from his book “Uncle Wiggily and the Littletails” that shows a usage of the term. Click on to read the chapter, Hiding the Easter Eggs (pdf).

Sammie Colored Sky-Blue-Pink – Story XXII

Sammie Colored Sky-Blue-Pink

Sammie Colored Sky-Blue-Pink, Story XXII

Continuing our exploration of the word Skilligimink, we check in on Howard R. Garis, the author of several books covering the adventures of Uncle Wiggily and his forest friends.

Here is a short chapter from his book “Uncle Wiggily and the Littletails” that shows a usage (probably the first) of the term. Click on to read the chapter, Sammie Colored Sky-Blue-Pink (pdf).

The Secret Garden

After a week or more of warm, early-spring rain on the moor around Misselthwaite Manor, one morning Mary wakes to find her world a bit different:

     “It must be very early,” she said. “The little clouds are all pink and I’ve never seen the sky look like this. No one is up. I don’t even hear the stable boys.”
     A sudden thought made her scramble to her feet.
     “I can’t wait! I am going to see the garden!”
     She had learned to dress herself by this time and she put on her clothes in five minutes. She knew a small side door which she could unbolt herself and she flew downstairs in her stocking feet and put on her shoes in the hall. She unchained and unbolted and unlocked and when the door was open she sprang across the step with one bound, and there she was standing on the grass, which seemed to have turned green, and with the sun pouring down on her and warm sweet wafts about her and the fluting and twittering and singing coming from every bush and tree. She clasped her hands for pure joy and looked up in the sky and it was so blue and pink and pearly and white and flooded with springtime light that she felt as if she must flute and sing aloud herself and knew that thrushes and robins and skylarks could not possibly help it. She ran around the shrubs and paths toward the secret garden.

The Secret Garden, by Frances Hodgson Burnett
(emphasis added)

You can read the whole of The Secret Garden or just Chapter 15.

The rainbow had fallen from the sky

To understand skilligimink, one must read the original sources. Here’s a prime example from the book Lulu, Alice and Jimmie Wibblewobble by Howard Roger Garis, chapter XI – Alice Wibblewobble’s Enchanted Castle.

Alice Wibblewobble goes on a walk and sees an amazing sight.

Then they went on a little farther, and, in a short time . . . they came to a most beautiful place. I wish you could have seen it! At first Alice thought the rainbow had fallen from the sky, there were so many colors. There was red and green and blue and orange and violet and yellow and pink and purple and even some of that skilligimink color, that once turned Sammie Littletail sky-blue-pink.

Then the little duck girl saw that the colors were all from different flowers that smelled just like mamma’s perfume bottles.

From Project Gutenberg‘s Lulu, Alice and Jimmie Wibblewobble by Howard Roger Garis. (emphasis added)

Skilligimink Lollypops

Story II - Uncle Wiggily and the Soup

First page of Uncle Wiggily and the Soup

One of the more frequent users (and most likely the originator as well) of the word Skilligimink is Howard R. Garis, the author of several books covering the adventures of Uncle Wiggily and his forest friends.

Here is a short chapter from his book “Uncle Wiggily in the Country” that shows one usage of the term. Click on to read the chapter, Uncle Wiggily and the Soup (pdf).

Please note that the reference takes place toward the end of the chapter. It may be interesting to also note that while Garis may be the originator of the word, it appears very likely that the tiddlewink is using it out of context in this chapter!

A new color, very scarce

To understand skilligimink, one must read the original sources. Here’s a prime example from the book Sammie and Susie Littletail, by Howard R. Garis, chapter XXII – Sammie Colored Sky-Blue-Pink.

Mamma Littletail prepares to dye Easter Eggs:

Well, you should have seen all the colors she had! There was red and blue and yellow and green and purple and pink and old rose and crushed strawberry and ashes of roses and magenta and Alice blue and Johnnie red and Froggie green and toadstool brown and skilligimink. That last, the storekeeper told Sammie, was a new color, very scarce. As there isn’t any more of it at the store, I can’t just tell you what it looked like, except that it was a very fine color indeed, Oh, yes!

Well, Sammie and Susie helped their mamma dip the eggs in the dye and stained them all sorts of pretty colors. Some were all one shade, and some were half one tint and half another, and then there were some all speckled with different colors, and very hard to make. Then, after they were all dry, Nurse Jane Fuzzy-Wuzzy, with her sharp teeth, just like chisels that a carpenter uses, drew pretty things on the eggs; pictures of trees and birds and mountains and flowers and fairy castles and lakes and hills, and all sorts of things. Oh, they were the prettiest Easter eggs you ever saw!

“Here is the last egg,” said Sammie. “May I dip this one in, mamma?”

“Yes,” she answered, but she never would have let him if she had known what was going to happen.

“I’ll make this a skilligimink color,” said Sammie, and he stood over the pot. Then, what do you think occurred? Why, Sammie leaned too far over and he fell right in that pot of skilligimink color; he and the egg together. And oh, dear me! what a time there was. He splashed around and scattered the skilligimink color all over the kitchen, and when his mamma and Susie fished him out, if he wasn’t dyed the most beautiful sky-blue-pink you ever saw! Oh, but he was a sight! The skilligimink color made him look like a piece of the rainbow. “Oh, Sammie!” cried Susie, “how funny you do look?” And Sammie grunted: “Huh! I guess it’s nothing to laugh at!” So they dried him with a towel, but the color didn’t come off for ever so long, honest it didn’t. But they had a lovely lot of Easter eggs, anyhow, ready for the children, and so Sammie didn’t mind much.

From Project Gutenberg‘s Sammie and Susie Littletail by Howard Roger Garis. (emphasis added)